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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13
speaker john boehner, and if you look at the deficit, it's been cut by more than half in 2009, the fastest deficit decline over a sustained period since world war ii, so would you acknowledge some progress is being made? >> yeah, i think it's a great point. if you look at the numbers, looks like quite a bit of progress has been made and the deficit has come down very quickly. that, of course, comes after a large rampup in the deficit where it grew by 800% before those four years, and i think more troubling is if you look at the nation's debt, where our debt levels are twice as large as they've been historically and are at historic highs and that's where the trouble is. while we've done a lot of deficit reduction, we've done it in the wrong way. we've focused on, i think, inadvertently through congress not being able to pick our policies on short-term measures that came out of the budget, which isn't where the problem is. what we should be doing is trying to replace those savings that came from the sequester that aren't as useful or long-term with more permanent and structural changes to en
is a distinguished churchman himself talked perfect sense. there is nothing moral about running up huge deficits about out of control welfare bills. if we do not deal with these problems, the whole country will be poorer. we should listen to the former arch bishop of canterbury. he said the churches should be aware of the dangers of blindly defending a gargantuan welfare budget that every serious politician would cut as a matter of economic common sense. i think serious politicians have to engage in it and that should go for everybody. >> ed miliband. >> i join my honorable friend's and congratulate the team on their brilliant performance at the winter olympics. as the immediate threat of flood passes, some levels are still underwater and hundreds of businesses and farms are still struggling to recover. the committee on climate change, the u.k. statistical authority have all said the government investment in flood defenses has fallen. in the light of this, does the prime minister think it is right to revisit the plan for investment in flood defense? >> we will look carefully at the plans. we hav
. more debt, higher deficits, rob our children blind and you're all in support of it? >> it's not that i'm in support of it let's talk about what it really is. the numbers already been decided. that was the whole partisan thing that happened a few months ago, what we're going to quick et over is how that money's going to be divided. >> we're going to gut defense. >> you may have heard that it's an election year. is it at all possible that this is an election budget that every one of us knows is never going through? >> we're going to rob our children? >> no, we're not. >> it's not going to happen. >> you know it's not going to happen. >> it's an election year. fudge it. >> i concede the point counselor. >> good night, folks. >> i concede that point, it's not going to happen, the fact that he wants it. didn't we learn? sl. >> he doesn't want it, congress wants it. >> everyone in congress has to run in november, it's a democratic budget p. >> why do they waste our time in. >> that's how politics works. you don't think the republicans do it when they're in the white house? >> you know there
he is recommending for each show agency and the deficit projections for 10 years. they say it will be low work, but how to make at work. obama will not be including the chain cpi proposal. inflation is measured that would have the effect of lowering social security benefits and other federal benefits. the aarp andsed by liberals in congress. arguing itthat out, was a all a branch for republicans. not willing to do a big deal on the deficit in order to get things under control. by taking that out, they will lose 230 billion or so in deficit reduction. already we know one of the ways will be assuming the senate passes and immigration overall. go much does that cost you these are the kinds of things we will be looking for. perhaps the least effective budgets we have seen in years because congress are it has a toplines appropriations number for this year. they are are ready holding hearings. this is entitlement overhaul out of the midterm. how is the budget actually released today, and to are the surrogates that the white house is sending to capitol hill over the next coming da
? it is contained. we do not think it is a contagion threat. in the so-called double deficit countries, they are quite small in terms of their exposure to the developed market angst. opportunityke this to buy more emerging-market equities right now? intoe you still buying other equity markets, more developed markets in the u.s. and eurozone? >> it depends on your timeframe. over the next six months, i don't see a lot of triggers that will send the emerging markets story into a by scenario. i would be cautious. the valuation discount is about 30% and that is attractive. and lot of contagion risk that is psychology with the ukraine and other stories is scary so i would be cautious to neutral on emerging markets right now. have thena does not risk of contagion, you mentioned the fragile five, which might present a risk when we talk about the contagion to emerging markets? >> i don't think any of the fragile five are a risk in the developed markets for a couple reasons. they are tiny. take argentina and venezuela and put them together, less than half a point of global gdp. they are really
moral about running up huge deficits, about out of control welfare bills. if we don't deal with these problems the whole country will be poor. i think we should listen to the words of george carey, the former archbishop of canterbury who said this. the churches should be aware of the dangers of blindly defending a gargantuan welfare budget that increases politician would cut as a matter of economic common sense. i think serious politicians have to engage in this and that should go for everybody. >> ed miliband. [shouting] >> mr. speaker, i join my honorable friend and the prime minister in congratulating team gb on a brilliant performance at the window limits but as the threat of floods passes there's thousands out of their homes. some are still underwater and hundreds of businesses and farms are still struggling to recover. the committee on climate change, the house of commons library and the uk statistical authority have all now said that government investment and flood defenses has fallen. in the light of this an event we have seen, does the prime minister think it's rig
that the russian budget is experiencing is that they are having an expanding deficit at $110 a barrel. if we go back several years, they're doing rather well balancing the budget at $60 a barrel. every single increased difficulty in funding export into what is the kremlin our needs and that is a full flow of finance. >> how much substitution can there be? are there ways around the situation? >> no. the energy crisis in the ukraine will become acute and quickly. , thered no difficulty was an arrangement that had been set up between ukraine and russian gas prom -- and russian azprom. there were supposed to be an extension of credit. all of that is over. it is back to cash on the barrel head and ukraine cannot afford to buy natural gas. an lngalking about terminal outside of odessa, but that will not particularly help. one problem people have not really looked at yet is the ukrainians, like a number of people in europe, have been relying on toward coal to offset the natural gas pricing situation. there are some reverberations this morning from the netscape onetsk. internally, we are having an ene
a real deficit. he let putin bring him down the garden path on syria, a country that was supposed to have given up all its kemic am weapons by february but has only given up 11% of them. what accountability have we heard demanded by the president. whether it's ukraine, china, syria, where wherever we see him, he just doesn't have what it takes to be taken seriously by foreign leaders. >> is he credible? what do you think? >> i think he's more than credible. for example, if you go back and look at 208 when russia went into georgia, we did nothing. that was at the height of our involvement in iraq and afghanistan. he's got the international community to put sanctions. these aren't going to be the treasury. these have to be international sanctions. nobody, even the harshest critic, wants to put boots on the ground. >> let me give you an example of why i think the credibility thing is a little bit tricky. look at what the president said at one point today. it's remarkable. >> one thing right away is to work with the administration to help buy assistance to the ukrainians to the people and tha
differentiate as i look the key issue for me is who is dealing with a budget deficit or who is not raising interest rates. what is the critical issue for you? willdonesia for example mark itself out as different from the others. elsewhere,ine and don't be too concentrated in emerging markets. political risk is large and it is not very well-predicted by investors. do be well diversified. take some overweight and underweight positions. we tend to be overweight the small countries and underweight the largest ones. underweight the brics historically. that can be difficult when china is on a strong rally. good stead over the long term. >> what is going on in china? i come in everyday, we have the yuan on the move, we are trying to lure him the currency? there is something very interesting in the past couple of weeks in china. >> they have to squeeze the excess is out of the system and it is going to be painful. we talked about volatility earlier. we can expect that to spike up later in the year. there is going to be some headline news out of china as this credit excess is squeezed. i think the
spending and not deficit reduction. the top republican on the senate budget committee says he wants to know when the president is going to get serious. >> this budget will not work. it's bad for america. it does not get us off the debt course we're on. it has total flimflam in it. in that it projects that we're going to raise taxes another $1.75 trillion. >> house budget chairman paul ryan said the president's budget is not a serious document. it is a campaign brochure. and aides say the soon to be le balance. >> mike emanuel live on the hill, thank you. >>> still ahead, what is the ukraine crisis doing to the u.s. space program. >>> first, the primary season kicks off in texas. it's eb. want to give your family the very best in taste, freshness, and nutrition? it's eb. want to give them more vitamins, omega 3s, and less saturated fat? it's eb. eggland's best eggs. eb's. the only eggs that make better taste and better nutrition... easy. eggland's best eggs. better taste. better nutrition. better eggs. it's eb. better eggs. your hepatitis c.forget it's slow moving, you tell yourself. i have
's ever proposed for, not for reducing deficit but more domestic spending. we've had huge spending increases, so those are such nonstarters, i don't see how you get common ground. granted, we're living under another budget agreement for now. but it's clear he's moving farther to the left to try and -- for those reasons and he's not trying to move to the middle. >> congressman, you said that three times, he's moved to the left, it's a nonstarter. does that mean i can't ask you about closing loopholes or -- >> yeah, sure, go ahead. >> are there any ways in which you all could maybe come to something and end up with one or two or three of these things and get some of the things that you want? >> yeah, so we just -- our chairman of the ways and means committee, dave camp, put out a specific discussion draft of tax reform, which does just that. it closes loopholes. instead of using the money for spending which increases the deficit -- he has $1.8 trillion in tax increases, half goes for spending. we're saying take the loophole closures and use it to lower tax rates to grow the economy.
issue of our time, attention deficit disorder,
discrimination by insurance companies, that will reduce the deficit, they need to bring it up for a vote, but they do not have solutions. what they want to do is deny health insurance coverage to millions of americans. that's a shame. and i think we are wasting our time today voting again to turn our backs on the bill that will offer so much to the american people. don't we have anything else to do? all we seem to do is deny science, which is the bill that will be coming up next, the republicans want to stop e.p.a. from dealing with the climate change issue, or denying the rights of people to get health insurance. which the republicans have voted over and over again to do. i urge we vote no on this bill and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentlewoman from kansas is recognized. ms. jenkins: madam speaker, i'd like to yield two minutes to the gentleman from texas, chairman kevin brady, our chair of the ways and means health subcommittee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. brady: madam sp
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13